LESS is more

How you can have fun writing CSS by writing LESS

We recently finished up the latest major version of a project at work, a web application that allows our clients to view Facebook Page analytics that we generate and empower them to craft their future social media strategy. The project has seen a couple iterations, but for this one, in an effort to make the whole thing simpler, we reworked most of it from the ground up, including a brand new user interface.

But while CSS is a very powerful tool, this web app was going to require a lot of it, using features from every version of CSS. And while “graceful degradation” was our methodology to some degree, the last version of this product didn’t support any browser except Chrome (because of time constraints) and it was made clear that this time, we would need to support all major browsers. This would mean hundreds of rules, nested rules, exceptions to rules, and fixes for The Browser That Shall Not Be Named.

So in an effort to simplify our CSS develop/test/deploy cycle, we decided to employ LESS, an extended CSS with support for nesting, variables, imports, and expressions.