Two sports stories

Two sports stories on this very early Monday morning.

  • First, what some are calling the best Super Bowl of all time, even better than last year, and the reason I’m not sleeping tonight. This year was rough for me because I had more of a vested interest in the game, but thanks to this catch from an Ohio State alumni, the Steelers won their sixth championship:


    Totally agree with the opinion that this broadcast was second to none. Al Michaels knows enough about football to know when to get excited and when to shut the heck up, and Madden was his normal self. I didn’t catch anything except the end of “Glory Days” by Springsteen, but I heard good things about that too. The game was great: it had its fair share of controversy, a 100 yd interception return, and great storylines that dated as far back as 2006.

  • The other story is less happy: led by our main man Dennis Kucinich, certain Congressmen feel it’s their duty to interfere in the naming rights of the Mets’ new stadium. It’s as if these career politicians couldn’t figure out that agreements have already been signed. Clearly they haven’t been in New York lately – that Citi Group sign was up when I visited over the summer (more photos):


    Even if the sign wasn’t up, even if the patch wasn’t chosen, even if they were complaining about this months ago…aren’t these the same guys that are throwing around trillions of dollars in bailout money? Who are they to talk about conservative spending? And more importantly, did we really elect you to worry about that stuff? I’m not sitting at Lazorpoint on work time writing music or checking my fantasy football teams; they shouldn’t be spending their work time worrying about sports (it must be a liberal thing, to want to control everything – search “barack obama bcs” and you’ll see).

    Instead of making the bailout work, these guys are looking for ways out if when the bailout doesn’t succeed. “Maybe if Citi group had saved that extra 400 million, we would have made that 800 trillion dollar bailout work. Or the next 800 trillion dollar bailout,” they’ll say. “It wasn’t our fault.”

    I’m tired of politicians making excuses, pointing fingers and not doing their jobs. That’s the kind of change we need – but no one is accountable anymore. Until that happens, we won’t turn around.